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The Nat
The Nat
The Nat
The Nat
The Nat
The Nat
The Nat
The Nat

Cotton Blocks

The Nat

Regular price $30.00
Unit price  per 

Fine Jersey 100% Combed Ring-Spun Cotton

Small Batch Printing

Our screen printed hoodies & tees are printed in small batches!

Orders ship within 1 week of order date, you will receive a shipping notification.

Backorder Order Option

Out of stock size/color can be ordered with the "backorder" option under the 'size' button when available. These items will be printed and shipped within 30 days. Cotton Blocks screen-prints our own tees & hoodies, we do not manufacture the tees and hoodies, we rely on the inventory of our fabulous partners and backordering options are based on that expected availability.

Care Instructions

  • Machine wash warm, inside out with like colors
  • Only non chlorine bleach
  • Tumble dry low
  • Medium Iron
  • Do not iron screen print
  • Do not dry clean

100 % No Sweatshops & Eco-Friendly

    *Model wearing military green

    Always Remember Nat (1800-1831)

    An American enslaved person and bondsman who led the only effective, sustained slave rebellion (August 1831) in U.S. history. Spreading terror throughout the white South, his action set off a new wave of oppressive legislation prohibiting the education, movement, and assembly of slaves and stiffened proslavery, anti-abolitionist convictions that persisted in that region until the American Civil War (1861–65).

    Who Was Nat Turner? 

    Turner was born the property of a prosperous small-plantation owner in a remote area of Virginia. His mother was an African native who transmitted a passionate hatred of slavery to her son. He learned to read from one of his master’s sons, and he eagerly absorbed intensive religious training. In the early 1820s he was sold to a neighboring farmer of small means. During the following decade his religious ardor tended to approach fanaticism, and he saw himself called upon by God to lead his people out of bondage. He began to exert a powerful influence on many of the nearby slaves, who called him “the Prophet.”

    Nat Turner’s rebellion put an end to the white Southern myth that slaves were either contented with their lot or too servile to mount an armed revolt. In Southampton county Black people came to measure time from “Nat’s Fray,” or “Old Nat’s War.” For many years in Black churches throughout the country, the name Jerusalem referred not only to the Bible but also covertly to the place where the rebel slave had met his death.

    In 1831, shortly after he had been sold again—this time to a craftsman named Joseph Travis—a sign in the form of an eclipse of the Sun caused Turner to believe that the hour to strike was near. His plan was to capture the armory at the county seat, Jerusalem, and, having gathered many recruits, to press on to the Dismal Swamp, 30 miles (48 km) to the east, where capture would be difficult. On the night of August 21, together with seven fellow slaves in whom he had put his trust, he launched a campaign of total annihilation, murdering Travis and his family in their sleep and then setting forth on a bloody march toward Jerusalem. In two days and nights about 60 white people were ruthlessly slain. Doomed from the start, Turner’s insurrection was handicapped by lack of discipline among his followers and by the fact that only 75 Blacks rallied to his cause. Armed resistance from the local whites and the arrival of the state militia—a total force of 3,000 men—provided the final crushing blow. Only a few miles from the county seat the insurgents were dispersed and either killed or captured, and many innocent slaves were massacred in the hysteria that followed. Turner eluded his pursuers for six weeks but was finally captured, tried, and hanged.